Photography by Royce Howland


Erosion 1

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land near a location in David Thompson Country. As weather & water carve away at the face of Abraham Mountain, the action emphasizes the large “shark teeth” forms. Loose rocks cascade down into the treeline below, eventually reaching the lake. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 2

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land near a location in David Thompson Country. Ridges and deep clefts have been formed in the surface of Mt. Michener by the channeled forces of erosion. The rock debris and run-off is carried down to the waters of Abraham Lake. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 7

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land in David Thompson Country. Great channels have been carved into the structure of Mt. Michener over uncountable years. Avalanches of snow, streams of meltwater and crumbled bits of the mountain itself continue to make their way down these channels year after year, eating ever deeper into the mountain and slowly reducing it to rubble at the bottom of the lake below. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 8

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land in David Thompson Country. The exposed rock strata of the complex including Siffleur Mountain and Mt. Peskett are chiseled away by time and the elements. Clouds race by overhead and water rushes past down below. Even long-lived forests will come and go in the blink of an eye compared to life span of the mountains. But eventually, the peaks too will be gone, reduced to small grains washed away through the flood plain. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 6

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land in David Thompson Country. As waves, wind and the freeze-thaw cycle continue to act on the shoreline along Abraham Lake, the bank is eaten away, freeing rocks and boulders previously held in place for millennia. Trees gradually become undercut and eventually collapse into the lake, perhaps ending up washed on the shore much later as driftwood. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 3

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land near a location in David Thompson Country. Rocks that have fallen down from the eroding mountain slopes end up on the forest floor, or embedded in a covering layer of soil. This in turn erodes under the force of water and weather, along the edges of creeks and the main shoreline of the lake, exposing the rocks once more. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 4

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land near a location in David Thompson Country. Trees give way to grass, and larger rocks are ground down into smaller pieces. The pebbles are released from the roots and soil, and are worn smooth by the water along the lakeshore. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.

Erosion 5

This is one in a series of views of different forces of erosion acting on the land near a location in David Thompson Country. Trees and rocks alike participate in natural processes of erosion that sculpt the landscape, taking decades or longer. Then people come along. They drive to the lakeshore, past signs that say “no motorized vehicles”. They cut down trees (dead or alive) with their chainsaws, and the more conscientious pull up rocks to make big fire pits. In the resulting camp fires, they burn anything & everything… except the excess garbage & junk left laying around, which blows or washes into the lake. Erosion. A.k.a. a nice, enjoyable weekend in the wilderness. Copyright © Royce Howland. All rights reserved.